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The Law Show

The Law Show on VOCM radio has come to an end. We sincerely hope you enjoyed listening to the program for the last seven months. As the podcasts are no longer available for download on VOCM, we are in the process of loading them all onto our website for your (free) listening pleasure. As you can see from the list below, it's a big project, but we will let everyone know when the podcasts are up and running.

Nov. 4, 2017 - Interim distributions
Oct. 28, 2017 - Mediation as an alternate to litigation
Oct. 21, 2017 - Taxes in an estate
Oct. 14, 2017 - Financial and estate planning
Oct. 7, 2017 - Police involvement in estates
Sept. 30, 2017 - Cleaning out a parent's house
Sept. 23, 2017 - Letters of Administration
Sept. 16, 2017 - Answers to more readers' questions
Sept. 9, 2017 - Get going! Get started on your estate planning
Sept. 2, 2017 - Digital assets (even if you think you don't have any)
August 26, 2017 - Bullet-proofing your will
August 17, 2017 - Practical tips and how-tos
August 10, 2017 - Estate-related words and phrases explained
August 3, 2017 - Answering beneficiary questions
July 27, 2017 - Adult guardianship
July 20, 2017 - Common mistakes in home-made wills
July 13, 2017 - Finding & working with a lawyer
July 6, 2017 - Executor's accounting
June 29, 2017 - Estates gone wrong
June 22, 2017 - Changing and/or removing executors
June 15, 2017 - Dying without a will
June 8, 2017 - Blended families
June 1, 2017 - Beneficiaries contesting wills
May 25, 2017 - Answering listeners' questions
May 18, 2017 - Enduring Powers of Attorney
May 11, 2017 - Executor's duties
May 4, 2017 - Myths and misconceptions about estates
Apr 27, 2017 - Joint property
Apr 20, 2017 - Using a trust company in your estate planning
Apr 13, 2017 - The building blocks of estate planning
April 6, 2017 - All about probate


  1. Why does bank hold inheritance of people because their old

    1. Are you saying that a bank held onto an inheritance of someone because the person was old? Doesn't sound like any bank I know of.


  2. Can an estate trustee with-hold an inheritance if a beneficiary doesn't sign a release, even though the Clearance Certificate has been received?

    1. No. In the old days, executors pretty much held the inheritance ransom until they got a signed release. In the last number of years, though, Canadian courts have said that this is not allowed.

      However, this does raise the question of why the beneficiary won't sign the release. There must be more to the story.


    2. The executors accounts are vague, for example saying cheque as a disembursment but not saying what for. Accountant fees but no billable hours or reasoning. Also it was said that there was more in the estate than the accounts are showing. No balances to bank accounts or receipts are provided.

  3. Lynn:
    I was a single foster parent (never married) for about 10 years. One boy who came to me at age 11, is still with me (now age 27). He has a career and is working full time.

    We never went the adoption route (although discussed) as he always felt this was his home.

    I have a legally drafted will which names him sole beneficiary (money, house, cars). My family have always considered him a grandson, nephew, etc.

    Although never legally adopted will he be treated as my son when the will is probated. I am 61 and am not planning on going anywhere (hopefully) for awhile.

    1. That's the beauty of making a will, Randy. You get to include people who otherwise would not be part of it. Without a will, your foster son would most likely have no right to inherit, though I expect he could make a run at it by saying you were acting as his parent for many years.


  4. Hi Lynne,
    The Executor of an Estate that I am a beneficiary to is withholding paying other beneficiaries inheritances because I and another beneficiary want more clarity on the accounts he has provided before we sign a release. I am starting to receive hostile e-mails. Can the executor not pay the other beneficiaries what they are entitled to?

    1. Usually an executor won't pay out any beneficiaries until all have signed off. This is because the amount being paid to the beneficiaries is a division of the available funds. If some of you don't sign off and the accounts have to be passed in court, the executor is going to have to pay legal fees from the estate. This reduces the amount available for the beneficiaries, which reduces each person's share. Therefore, until all have signed off, the executor doesn't know what each person is entitled to get.



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