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Lynne writes her books in the same straightforward style as she writes her blog posts. If you want to know more about almost any topic under wills, estates, probate, or elder law, click here to see the full selection of Lynne's books. This link will take you to a new site where you can see the books, read their descriptions, and purchase them if you wish.

5 comments:

  1. I am the executor of my Mom's estate. It is s straight-forward estate which does not require probate. I need a template of a standard release form (recognized in Alberta) which I can send out to the beneficiaries. Do you know where/how I can find such a template?

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    Replies
    1. I should probably also mention that my book, Alberta Probate kit, contains all the forms an executor needs, as well as instructions for completing them and using them, providing an accounting to the beneficiaries, and lots of other useful stuff.

      Lynne

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  2. The Releases vary province to province. Alberta happens to be a province in which a specific form is found in the regulations to the Rules. It's called ACC12 and can be found here:
    http://www.canlii.org/en/ab/laws/regu/alta-reg-130-1995/latest/alta-reg-130-1995.html

    Scroll down to ACC12.

    Lynne

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  3. My step-mother wouldn't show the Will after my father passed away. But she wants to sign a paper says that I would give up the property in Egypt and transferred them under her name. How could I find my father's Will to see what I am entitled? Thank you very much.

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    Replies
    1. My first suggestion would be to do a search at the courthouse nearest where your father lived. If his will has been sent for probate, it is now a publicly-available document. Just a tip - if you do find it, ask for ALL the documents and not just the will.

      If she still will not show you the will, get a lawyer. Since she wants you to give up a property, you must either currently be an owner, or you are supposed to receive some portion of it in the will. That gives you standing to see the will. The lawyer will write a letter explaining why she should hand over a copy of the will.

      If she still does not give you a copy and nobody else in the family will give you a copy either, then you have the option of forcing her through the courts to give you one. I would be surprised if it actually got all the way to court, but if it did and if you're a beneficiary under the will, she would be made by the court to pay your legal fees as well as her own.

      Just to be clear, it is not the fact that you are a son or daughter that gives you rights here. It is the fact that you appear to be the beneficiary of property.

      Lynne

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