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Monday, December 31, 2018

Man digs up Dad's grave to argue with him

For my last post of 2018, I've found a real winner. Yesterday a man named Michael May was found by police digging up a grave. He told the police (and later, a reporter) that he was digging up his father so that he could argue with him. I swear I'm not making this up! Here is the link for you to read more details about this story.

For his efforts, Mr. May was charged with violating graves, public intoxication, and marijuana possession. He was taken to jail in Lincoln County, KY. The grave he was digging was probably not actually his father's, as it happens. Police have not yet confirmed the identity of the person whose grave was being dug.

The reason this story caught my eye (other than the fact that arguing with a corpse is a somewhat unusual behaviour) is that it seems to me that this is what might happen to people who refuse to make wills even when their families ask them to. "What do I care what happens after I'm gone? I'll be dead!" says the stubborn, intestate person, usually followed by a hearty laugh at his or her own cleverness. It's true that many people are content to leave a big mess behind when they pass on for their children or spouse to sort out. I have no idea of what Michael May wanted to argue about with his father, but I do know that I see an awful lot of people who are angry that their parents won't make wills.

A refusal to make a will causes arguments and recriminations while the intestate person is alive and often results in bitter disputes, family break-ups, and huge financial losses after the person passes away. Perhaps Michael May just wanted to have the last word.

The attached photo of Michael May accompanied this news story at www.huffingtonpost.ca and is credited to Lincoln County Jail.

1 comment:

  1. Lynne,

    A refusal to make a will causes arguments and recriminations while the intestate person is alive and often results in bitter disputes, family break-ups, and huge financial losses after the person passes away [Lynne Butler]
    You make a good point, but as some of us know, even a well written 'will' does not prevent bitter disputes, family break-ups, and huge financial losses after the person passes away.

    Webeye

    ReplyDelete

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