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Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Cinderella's Trust Fund: serious legal information powered by nursery rhymes and fairy tales

We talk about pretty serious topics here most days, but it doesn't all have to be gloomy. If you like your wills and estates information with a bit of light-heartedness, take a look at my book called "Cinderella's Trust Fund". It contains tons of information about estate planning, trusts, joint property, choosing an executor, powers of attorney, blended families, and much more. The fun part is that interspersed with the text are nursery rhymes and fairy tales that illustrate the points being made. From Baa Baa Intestate Sheep to Beauty and the Bequest, the stories you know and love are re-told from an estate lawyer's point of view. Here's an example:

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
She had several children, but she knew what to do.
She couldn’t put all of them on the title,
Since costs were important but harmony was vital.
“I’ll treat you all fairly in my will,” she said,
“Sell my house and split the funds after I’m dead.”

and here's another:

Old King Cole was a merry old soul
 And a merry old soul was he;
 He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl
 And he called for his lawyers three.

 Every lawyer had a quill,
 And a parchment to write on, had he;
 Oh there's none so smart, to get a start
 Like King Cole and his lawyers three.

He talked of wills and heirs for hours,
And a wonderful talk had he,
They made a will; it’s valid still
For Cole and his children three.

Some of the tales used in the book are Cinderella, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Little Red Riding Hood, Humpty Dumpty, Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed, The Emperor's New Clothes, Old King Cole, The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe, Beauty and the Beast, Puss in Boots, Sleeping Beauty, and London Bridge is Falling Down.

Who knew that reading about wills and estates could actually be fun? Click here for more information or to purchase this book. And enjoy!


1 comment:

  1. Lynne
    There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
    She had several children, but she knew what to do.
    She couldn’t put all of them on the title,
    Since costs were important but harmony was vital.
    “I’ll treat you all fairly in my will,” she said,
    “Sell my house and split the funds after I’m dead.”

    A very wise woman.

    Lynne,

    This was not the case in our parents will, but as the executor, I suggested to my sibling (who was living in the estate house) that it might be a good fit and perhaps she should buy the house. As I found out later on, the sibling wanted to buy the house all along. However at the meeting to complete the transfer, things fell apart. It became a nightmare, an Estate Horror Story that is yet to be resolved and settled after many years.
    My question to you is, how could I have better handled this situation. Should I have asked my sibling to sign a note as to our agreement re the house prior to meeting with the lawyer. Note, the same lawyer for both was used as it was a simple transfer. The lawyer had previously worked for my the sibling and parent. I used this lawyer as a last resort due to health reasons.

    ReplyDelete

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